Our throw-away culture needs a rethink. It’s killing our personal finances, health and planet

Maybe I’m getting old, but it feels like many things just aren’t built to last anymore. Planned obsolesence, which is a business strategy to have things fail and encourage consumers to replace them, seems to be real phenomenon. In addition, we have endless items available to us as consumers that are virtually disposable – super low cost, easily accessible and so cheap that you’re happy to buy without thinking, even if only to use once or twice. Sometimes I think things are just too affordable.

Even if something doesn’t break, we feel compelled to replace it in time anyway. Marketers employ sophisticated techniques to convince us that new is good and old is less desirable. “Keeping up with the Joneses” mentality is unfortunately common place and, as consumers, we are conditioned to buy, buy, buy.

What is the true cost of our hyper consumerist, disposable society?

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Having a bad day at work? The pursuit of Financial Independence helps me cope, insulates me from economic downturns and gives me hope for the future

Work was tough last week – long hours, lots of pressure and an unsatisfactory discussion with my boss about the future of my role. It reaffirmed for me one of the key reasons that I’m pursuing financial indepence (FILLS) – to be free from the golden handcuffs of work (or at least this job) and have choices around how I spend my time. To live a life of purpose, meaning and joy without the burden and daily grind of paid work. To have the mental space to be present with my family at night, instead of responding to emails. The chance to pursue my dreams and ambitions rather than those of my corporate masters.

Regardless of whether you love, hate or are ambivalent about work, removing your reliance on a paycheck is both liberating and prudent.

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