A simple and meaningful life by focusing on the essentials

Is your working day characterized by endless meetings and an equally never ending to-do list? Do you lack the time to think and are you just in a cycle of doing?

I know the feeling, which is why I was excited to be given the excellent book Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by author Greg McKeown.

Sitting down to read Essentialism with a cup of green tea

To my surprise, the applicability of lessons outlined in Essentialism extended far beyond the work context and time management strategies. At its core, this is a book about focusing on what is absolutely essential, then eliminating everything that is not, so you can concentrate on the things that really matter. For me, the book reaffirmed my belief that a simple life can be fulfilling, productive and meaningful.

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How to live a more simple life without money worries

There is no one-size-fits-all definition of a simple life, but for me it is about uncomplicated, sustainable living. A life of happiness and intention which isn’t ruled by possessions or the expectations of others. Living a simple life is about having the time, energy, health and resources to focus on things, topics and people that matter. It’s about doing and having less, while gaining and giving more. It’s about choice, control and contentment, rather than reacting to societal pressures, norms and rampant consumerism. It’s about finding real happiness and a high quality of life.

“There is nothing that the busy man is less busy with than living: there is nothing harder to learn”

Seneca
Seeing what is important in life

Being clear about the life you want to lead is important. Below are ways I’m working towards that simple life:

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Minimalism Journey: Decluttering and generating some extra money in the process

I’ve posted previously about our liberating decision to start living with fewer possessions (The benefits of subtraction – the freedom and happiness gains of owning less). This has involved not only buying less, but also reducing the number of number of things we have in the house. Letting go of stuff is a process. Even when we are are ready emotionally to let things go, deciding what to do with the stuff is important.

What we’ve discovered in the process of decluttering and selling over 100 items in the last six months (in addition to everything we have donated or thrown away), is that the old adage “One man’s trash, is another man’s treasure” is true. We have managed to generate almost $7,000 in cash by selling unused and unwanted items including sporting equipment, comics, books, kids toys and some furniture. Old LEGO has been especially popular.

This wasn’t an emergency cash grab, but rather an intentional process of donating, selling and discarding superfluous stuff. Less physical clutter, creates more mental space and gratitude for the things we keep and value.

Minimalism: The process of decluttering can be a source of extra money
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Ways to combat overspending on impulse buys and save more money

I’m an aspiring frugal minimalist, working towards Financial Independence. Given that, saving should be second nature and easy for me, right? Well normally we are are pretty good and put money away like clockwork, but this week was a reality check as my monthly budget went up in flames. The budget collapse wasn’t due to any unforeseen disaster, medical emergency, or car problems. I simply overspent and purchased what could be classified as an unnecessary, luxury item.

So what went wrong and how do I avoid overspending in the future?

There goes the budget….

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Living with Less to Gain More

Do you ever have the feel like you’re being pulled in multiple directions, overworked and stressed, never have enough time or are constantly worrying about money? Me too.

Somewhat paradoxically “less” may be the secret to getting back control over your life. Focusing on the essentials, being more selective about what we do, minimizing the stuff we strive to obtain and consume, spending time with the people that matter. Living a life with less allows us to focus on what really matters. Cutting out the crap, the unnecessary and the toxic, is key to making this philosophy work.

Time to focus on a beautiful sunset
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Convenience is bad for your finances and wellbeing

Clearly there is some hyperbole in the title of this blog post, but as a society we should be more conscious of the real choices we are making in exchange for convenience.

Technology, services and products that save us time, provide broader access to solutions, satisfy our need for instant gratification, reduce effort or streamline processes can be very appealing. There is no question that in many instances these conveniences deliver short term benefits and momentarily boost happiness.

However we also need to be aware of the downsides associated with minimizing effort and difficulty. What appears to be a “no-brainer” convenience may result in more harm than good over the longer term for you (and society), impacting your finances, physical and mental health, relationships and sense of purpose.

A couple of quick examples:

Car addicted society?
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The benefits of subtraction – the freedom and happiness gains of owning less

The simple life

My wife and I made the decision a few months ago to live with fewer possessions. We’ve sold, donated or discarded a huge percentage of our family’s possessions. Tables, books, TV’s, desks, outdoor furniture, boxes of Lego, clothes, plus other things that now just didn’t seem necessary in our lives. When we actively started looking around at our “stuff”, we realized how superfluous a lot of it really was. It’s been a liberating process.

This intentional choice has delivered a number of tangible benefits for us:

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